Over the weekend I watched two of the best films I’ve EVER seen.

Alejandro, a tough and ambitious Latino street orphan on the verge of adolescence, lives and works in an auto-body repair shop in a sprawling junkyard on the outskirts of Queens, New York. In this chaotic world of adults, young Alejandro struggles to make a better life for himself and his 16-year-old sister, Isamar. He finds her a job in a food van cooking and selling meals to the auto-body workers, and with a mixture of childlike naiveté and adult ambition, Alejandro begins obsessively saving his money to buy a mobile-food van as the siblings dream about owning and running a small business of their own. But when their dream, and their loving relationship, is threatened by the hard truths of life, work, and one another, the children find themselves forced to make the kinds of difficult decisions that most adults never have to face.

Noruz Films

Jasira wants something she can’t define: attention, love, acceptance or a normal life. Unfortunately, she doesn’t know the right way to find it. When Jasira’s mother exiles her to Houston to live with her strict, quick-to-anger Lebanese father, she quickly learns what aspects of herself to suppress in front of him. In private, however, she conducts her sexual awakening with all the false confidence that pop culture and her neighbor’s magazines have provided. The result is a funny, dark, bold and harrowing look at the confusion and misguided exploration of youth in America’s track houses, public schools and suburban wastelands. Based on Alicia Erian’s novel “Towelhead”.

Rotten